• FTNetwork

Top tips for female solo travellers

Updated: Jun 17



These days, more and more women are choosing to travel alone and have completely outnumbered male solo travellers. In fact, research from Hostelworld shows that bookings made by female solo travellers have increased by 88% over the past four years! This could be for many reasons – having children later on in life, taking career breaks (or switching careers entirely), being more financially independent, and having greater access to solo-friendly packages and deals.


With this in mind, we’ve put together a few top tips for female solo travellers:


1. Book your first few nights of accommodation

If you’re not a huge planner and intend on moving around a bit then make sure you have at least a few nights of accommodation booked. That way, you can give yourself a day or two to get a feel of your surroundings and talk to other travellers before moving on. This shouldn’t take the fun and spontaneity out of the trip, but rather give you that buffer you need as you find your feet in a new country.


2. Try to travel during the daytime

When it comes to incidents, it’s a known fact that they are more likely to occur at night. Therefore try and arrive at places during the day (or when it’s still light). Although night flights and night buses are usually cheaper, there’s a reason for this. Arriving at airports and bus stations late at night or in the early hours can make it difficult to catch the transport links you need to get to your hostel or hotel safely.


3. Do as locals do

In some instances you might want to blend in. This means avoiding outfits that scream “tourist” and respecting any local customs. For example, in some countries women dress more modestly and need to have their shoulders and knees covered up. You may also want to tone down any jewellery and fancy gadgets such as cameras and GoPros when you’re in crowded areas!


4. Stay on the radar

Although you might be looking to escape and get some downtime, it’s still important to keep in touch with family and friends as much as you can. Let them know where you’re going to be and when. Logging updates on any social platforms you have is also a great way to make sure you have people looking out for you as you travel.


5. Prepare with basic phrases

Communication can easily become a blocker when abroad. Learning a few simple phrases that cover basic needs, directions, and asking for help or a doctor is key. Plus, it always impresses locals when you can speak a bit of the lingo – it could also make you seem more savvy and prevent you from getting ripped off too.


6. Have a plan B

In the event that your plans fall through or you find yourself in a sticky situation, a plan B could save the day. This could mean researching hotels and hostels in the area you’re visiting in case your accommodation falls through, and also researching alternative travel means in case you miss a flight or train. And finally, always make sure you have travel insurance so you’re not fretting about unexpected costs.



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